Summer Smoothie Recipes

Summer Smoothie Recipes

Summer will be here before you know it, so cooling off with a refreshing smoothie will surely hit the spot. Kids love to drink a sweet and thick smoothie since the consistency and chill-factor is just like that of an indulgent milkshake. But you can make summer smoothies that are far healthier for your kids than milkshakes are, and they won’t miss all the extra fat and calories since these smoothie recipes are extraordinarily delicious. Kids will run in from playing outside for a cool sip and you’ll love the fact that they are so easy to make. Kids will get some much-needed servings of fruits and veggies with every glass and you won’t even have to force them to eat healthfully! Let’s get started with a few simple smoothie recipes that will tickle everyone’s taste buds! Each recipe makes 2 servings.   Peaches ‘n Crème Pour one 16 oz. can of diced peaches into a blender with the juice included. Add ½ cup low-fat milk and an 8 oz. container plain or vanilla yogurt. Add one ripe banana for added natural sweetness and blend until smooth. Pour into tall glasses and garnish with a peach wedge. Smooth and delicious with a peachy-great taste. Serve with graham crackers or Nilla wafers to create a peach pie combination!   Berry Blast Off Toss ½ cup blueberries, 1 cup chopped strawberries, and 1 cup raspberries into a blender. Add one ripe banana, ¾ cup orange or apple juice, and ¼ cup fat-free half and half. Scoop in 1 cup vanilla frozen yogurt and 2 tablespoons sugar-free strawberry jam. Blend until smooth...
Show Your Child How to Cheer Up a Friend Who is Feeling Down

Show Your Child How to Cheer Up a Friend Who is Feeling Down

When your child is with her pals, most of the time it’s all sunshine and rainbows. Smiles and laughter prevail, and the kids play, run, and share. Hopefully, things are like this all or most of the time, but eventually, one of your child’s friends may not be having the best day. Perhaps something happened during the school day that put her in a negative mood, she has trouble at home, she got some bad or sad news, or something else happened to make her feel down in the dumps. Kids may not know how to react or what to do if their friend is having a hard day. They may dismiss the behavior and ignore it, get worried themselves, or refrain from interacting with their friend. Not because they are uncaring or unsympathetic, but they may not know just what to do. You can give your child some tools to help their friend cheer up. A little advice can go a long way for a child who is put in the position of helping a friend in need. Rather than feeling scared or awkward, your child can be a shoulder to cry on and a bright spot in their friend’s otherwise miserable day. Listen If your child notices that her friend seems down, advise her to tell her friend that she would like to know why she’s sad. She is there to listen, learn, and understand. Your child may not have the answers or a way to make things better, but an open ear and a comforting friend may just help her pal get out of her funk...
Teaching Kids It’s OK to Lose

Teaching Kids It’s OK to Lose

We all want our kids to succeed in everything they embark upon, and hopefully they do well in their efforts. Winning is often times considered the goal when it comes to sports, competitions, getting the best grades in school, and so on. That said, it is pretty rare that any person knocks it out of the park 100% of the time. There will be people who are more athletic, more talented, more prepared, or just have a lucky day. We will all fail, make mistakes, or not to our very best from time to time. While this notion may be upsetting or frustrating, particularly for children, we must teach them that it is OK to lose sometimes. As long as they tried hard, had fun, and learned something in the process, they are still a winner. Winning all the time might not even be so great anyhow. If your kid is always #1, he may not have the incentive to try harder to better himself. This could lead to slacking off, slowing down, or becoming complacent with the status quo. Even the best kid on the baseball team can train harder to excel even further. The spelling bee champ always has new words to learn. The straight-A student can still expand his mind to learn new things. The dance recital soloist must always stay strong and in shape in order to continue dancing with grace and fine form. Remind your child that the point of their activities is to become a well-rounded individual. Play sports for the exercise, teamwork, and fun. Do well in school to learn and grow,...
Healthy Springtime Side Dishes Kids Will Love

Healthy Springtime Side Dishes Kids Will Love

Springtime is here, making light and healthy eating even more welcome as the weather warms up and everyone’s more active. Many parents are used to allowing the kids to eat fries, onion rings, and mac and cheese as side dishes, and although those foods are delicious, they aren’t the healthiest of options. Here are some springtime side dish ideas the kids (and you) will enjoy and they won’t miss the usual fried and fattening fare. Getting kids used to eating healthfully and mindfully will set them up for a future full of good health and happiness. Let’s get started with eating well this spring!   Green Beans and Slivered Almonds in a Light Vinaigrette Steam 4 servings of green beans in boiling water until tender and throw into ice cold water to cease further cooking. Towel dry and place in a bowl. Add a ½ cup of slivered almonds (you can buy them at the grocer this way) and stir. Add salt and pepper to taste and 3 tablespoons olive oil and ¼ cup red wine vinegar. Toss together lightly and serve as a cold side dish. This will pair well with chicken, fish, or even pasta dishes.   Baked Sweet Potato Fries Slice 2 large sweet potatoes or yams into the shape of long fries and set out on a cookie sheet sprayed with non-stick cooking spray. Sprinkle with sea salt and seasonings of your choice and heat in a pre-heated oven set at 350 degrees for 25 minutes. Serve with mustard or ketchup or on their own as a yummy and healthy alternative to regular French fries....
Study Finds Baby Blues Dietary Prevention

Study Finds Baby Blues Dietary Prevention

Perhaps you’ve experienced “baby blues” yourself or know someone who has. This special time in a woman’s life when she is “supposed” to be blissfully happy can become something far from it. As per BabyCenter, “Anywhere from 40 to 80 percent of new mothers experience the baby blues – an emotional state of tearfulness, unhappiness, worry, self-doubt, and fatigue. The baby blues typically begin a few days after delivery and go away on their own within a week or two.” According to American Pregnancy, other symptoms can include impatience, irritability, restlessness, insomnia, poor concentration, and mood changes. Instead of hoping and wishing women never experience this post-birth period, new research out of The Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) has discovered a three-supplement “nutrition kit” that has been found to virtually eliminate baby blues in women who have just given birth. CAMH found a notable difference in the emotional stability of 21 new mothers who, as part of the study, were given two amino acids for mood-regulation, and a blueberry extract for its anti-oxidant effects. A control group of 20 women did not receive the supplements in the days after giving birth. The 21 mothers who received the nutrition kit were given the supplements over the course of three days, starting on the third day after giving birth. Those who were given the supplements did not experience any depressed mood, while the new mothers who were not taking the supplements had much higher instances of depression. These findings can be a blessing for mothers-to-be who are worried that they will suffer from baby blues, particularly if they did with a...
More Delicious Popsicle Recipes the Kids Will Love

More Delicious Popsicle Recipes the Kids Will Love

Spring has finally sprung which means the weather will warm up soon… hopefully. A while back, we posted some recipes for fun and delicious homemade popsicles and many of you have asked for more yummy ideas. The creamy orange pops, cranberry lime pucker pops, and marvelous melon pops were fruity fan favorites and there’s more where those came from. Please enjoy some new, creamy-style recipes for homemade popsicles the kids will love. Adults will gobble them up too, especially on a warm and sunny day as a way to cool down in the tastiest way possible. Again, you’ll need popsicle molds or plastic cups with wooden popsicle sticks in order to make them. These recipes should yield about 6-8 pops depending upon the size of your molds. You can also make mini-pops in your ice cube tray for a sample-size treat.   Root Beer Float Refreshers Who doesn’t love a refreshing and zippy root beer float as a special summertime (or anytime) treat? Think of how tasty this flavor combo would be in a popsicle form. Here’s how to make them: Combine a cup of root beer (regular or diet will work) with ½ cup of heavy cream and ½ cup of whole or low-fat milk. Pour into a blender with ¾ cup vanilla ice cream or low-fat vanilla frozen yogurt. You can also try a caramel flavor if you can find it for extra richness. Blend until smooth and pour into the molds. Freeze until solid, preferably overnight. Once they are ready, pop ‘em out and enjoy! You’ll feel like you are at the ice cream shop.  ...
Tips for Raising a Giving Child

Tips for Raising a Giving Child

We all want our kids to be caring and compassionate individuals. Teaching a child to be giving must start early so it is always part of her personality and demeanor. It won’t feel forced, and with positive reinforcement, it will be something she’s proud to do and excited to continue to carry on for a lifetime of giving to others. You can help your child to be giving and she will always have concern for those less fortunate and in need of help or just a friend to lean on. You don’t need a lot of money or resources in order to make a difference. Sometimes, it’s the little things that count the most.   Lend a Hand Sometimes just being there to help or for comfort is all someone needs from somebody else to know they care. Teach your child to offer to help a friend put their toys away or walk their dog. Older kids can help the younger ones make their bed or with their homework. There will be times when a friend will need a shoulder to cry on or someone to talk to about a hard time. Tell your child that she can be this person and in return, she will feel proud of herself for showing care to someone who needed it at the time. Helping others is a way to help yourself grow to become a stronger and more patient person.   Visit a Shelter Kids need to experience things in order to learn the full extent of what’s really going on. Take your child to an animal shelter so she can...
Teaching Kids About Using Common Sense

Teaching Kids About Using Common Sense

Book smarts is one thing, but “street smarts” and common sense are quite another. Every person is different and has a varying degree of natural common sense in their personality. But no matter the level of your child’s common sense and intelligence, you can still teach him to use what they’ve got to the best of their abilities and help them develop it wisely and thoughtfully. Kids are like sponges and will learn by instruction, example, and practice. Here are some ways you can instill common sense into your child and help him get better and better at putting his common sensibilities into practice. He will grow into a more responsible person and make smarter choices when faced with a struggle. Start Early Allow your child to make simple choices at an early age. If you do everything for him and never let him experiment or explore, as he gets older, he won’t be as confident to make decisions. Of course, your parenting will guide him down the smart path, but give him a chance to choose right from wrong and see where his mind takes him. Kids are smarter than we think, and the more we put our trust in their basic decision-making skills, the more they’ll use them. Kids are naturally curious, so let them seek answers on their own when possible. Allow Them to Fail/Make Mistakes Along the way, your child will pick the wrong choice or make poor decisions. This is how he’ll learn to reassess the next time and try something that works better. Failure is only the stepping stone to future success. Let...
Simple Ways to Start Your Child’s Day Off Positively

Simple Ways to Start Your Child’s Day Off Positively

When a child starts their day off on the right foot, it can make their entire day a great one. As a parent, you can help your child begin each day on a positive note so the energy from within is upbeat and she’s ready to take on the world… or at least the classroom. With a little parental inspiration, your child will have the self-esteem and reassurance to make her day a positive one from the moment she wakes up until you head out for daycare or school. This vibe will stick with her throughout the day and will make a real difference in how she performs in school, interacts with peers, and how she feels about herself in general. Here are a few ways to start the day on a high note that will make your child eager to awaken each day. Knowing that you’ll always have words of inspiration and tools to help her to succeed, your child will be confident, happy, and supportive of others by spreading her positivity all around. Play Music to Wake Her Up Alarm clocks can be quite alarming and shouting “Wake up!” isn’t exactly the most peaceful way to start the day. Instead, play your child’s favorite song in order to wake her up. You can come up with a week-long playlist for some variety, or have one special “wake up” song to start the day off with some fun. Popping out of bed ready to get on your feet and dancing towards the breakfast table is eye-opening and energizing. You may even want to try this technique for yourself!...
2 Major Ways Kids Show They’re Anxious About School

2 Major Ways Kids Show They’re Anxious About School

It can be tricky to get the truth out of our kids. We can ask how they like school or how their day was, but kids may hide what is really going on. Sometimes kids will say everything is OK when they are really having anxiety about their schoolwork, their teacher, their friends, or something else that is school-related. If you think your child is anxious in some way about school but they are not telling you directly, there are signs you can look out for. Not everything is cut and dry and each child is different, but if you see either of these behaviors from your child, it may be time for a heart-to-heart talk about what may be bothering them and then to take the needed steps to make things better. Getting to the root of the matter may take time, but you can help your child open up by starting the conversation and offering tools and intervention methods to lessen or get rid of their anxiety altogether. They Feign Illness Do you find that your child pretends to be sick before school regularly but they feel great after school and on weekends? It may be more than a case of wanting to play “hooky.” Your child may be having issues at school. Maybe he cannot keep up in class. Perhaps kids are bullying him. He could be afraid to participate in classroom discussions for fear of embarrassment. What if he has no friends? Let your child know he can talk to you about anything. Let him know that all kids have insecurities. You can also talk...